Dated Index
 
Dated Satires
 
Home

1794


Courtesy of the Print Collection, New York Public Library

The Watchman

Published March 14th 1794 by John Fairburn, Map, Chart, and Printseller No. 146 Minories, London

The scene illustrates the second of three episodes in the poem inscribed below. In the first episode the watchman, for the "odd Candlestick," ignores a burglery in progress, and in the third he helps a pursesnatch go free. Here as in the second episode, he confronts a young gentleman who is climbing a rope ladder to his lover's chamber. She reaches through the window to help him up and another woman comes out the door to urge him on. The watchman in his long coat and a hat held on with a scarf grabs the gentleman's jacket and flourishes his sword. The gentleman offers him a handful of coins to abort the arrest. The watchman's lamp and baton lie at his feet at the ladder's end and on down the street the watchman's box juts out onto the sidewalk. Next to the box a young man and woman embrace and further on a carraige stands near a corner. In the distance, the dome of St. Paul's protrudes over the cornice of the building that borders the street on the left. This print relates to The Guardian of the Night, (BMC 9101) in echoing a song from Charles Dibdin's entertainment, Castles in the Air (1793).

1
A Watchman I am, and I knows all the round,
The Housekeepers, the strays, and the Lodgers,
Where the low Devils, rich Dons, and high Rips may be found,
Odd Dickies, queer Kids, and rum Codgers,
Of Money & of Property, Im he that takes the care,
And cries when I see Rogues go by,
Hey what are you doing there,
Only a little Business in that House you understand me
Understand you? Well I believe you are an honest Man.
D'ye hear, bring me an odd Candlestick
Then to my Box I creep, and then fall fast asleep.
St. Paul's strikes One, thus after all the Mischiefs done.
I goes and gives them warning,
And loudly bawls while strikes St. Paul's,
Past One o'Clock, and a Cloudy Morning.
2
Then round as the Hour I merrily cries,
Another fine Mess I discover
For a curious Rope Ladder, I straightway espies,
And Miss Forward expecting her Lover,
Then to each others Arms they fly.
My Life my Soul Ah! Ah!
Fine work Miss hot upont cries I,
Ill knock up your Papa;
No you wont; I shall; worthy old Soul to be treated in
this manner; here, here, take this; oh you Villain want to
bribe an honest Watchman; & with such a trifle too, well
well, here's more, more, you seem to be a spirited Lad, now do
make her a good Husband, I am glad you have trick'd the
Old Hunks, good night; I wish you safe to Gretna Green.
Then to my Box I creep, and then fall fast asleep,
What's that St. Paul's strkes two,
The Lovers off, what does I do,
But give the Father warning,
And loudly bawls, while strikes St. Paul's
Past Two o'Clock, and a Cloudy Morning.
3
Then toward the Square, from my Box I looks
I hear such a ranting, and tearing
The Pharoah's whole host, and the Pigeons & Rooks
Are Laughing, and Singing, and Swearing,
Then such a Hubbub, and a Din
How they Blaspheme and Curse,
That Thief has stolen my Diamond Pin;
Watch, Watch, I've lost my Purse,
Watch, I charge you and I charges you; tis a marvellous thing
that honest people can't go home without being robb'd; which is
the thief; that's the thief that trick'd me out of two Hundred
Pound this evening; Ah that you know is all in the way of
Business; but which is the thief that stole the Gentleman's
Purse; thats him; what Sam Snatch? Give it to me Sam; he
has not got your purse, you are mistaken in your man;
Go home peaceably & dont oblige me to take you to ye watch house.
Then to my Box I creep, and then fall fast asleep
What's that St. Paul's strikes three
Thus from my roguery I gets free by giving people warning,
And loudly bawls while strikes St. Paul's,
Past Three o'Clock, and a Cloudy Morning.

This print is the earlier and full-size source for the miniature engraving, catalogued by George as BMC 8559 and published by C. Sheppard five months later "Augt 23 1794."

28.5 x 25 cm.
New York Public Library (Satyr p.128)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

A CONTEST BETWEEN SOOT & FLOUR

Publish'd 2 May 1794 by Laurie & Whittle 53 Fleet Street, London

A chimney sweep and a shopboy battle on a city street. The black handprint on the shopboy's coat suggests what may have provoked the battle. He punches the sweep in the face, as he raises his hands to protect himself and backs away. In the shopboy's other hand, cocked overhead, he wields an implement that looks rather like crossed iron but may be a carrying handle the two large boxes that lie behind him.

13.9 x 11 cm.
Lewis Walpole Library (794.5.12.12)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Yale Center for British Art, Yale University

THE COUNTRY BALLAD SINGERS

Publish'd 2 May 1794 by Laurie & Whittle 53 Fleet Street, London

A family of ballad singers, a woman and her three children, sit beside a country road. The oldest boy(r.) sits on one side of her, a younger boy stands on the other, a small dog at his feet. An infant, bundled in a blanket, sits on the mother's lap. Along with the child, she also hold a ballad inscribed on a long strip of paper. A basket in front of the smaller boy displays another open ballad and rolled ballads tied in bundles. In the background, a man fishes from a lake that stretches past a village with church steeple.

31.7 x 24.7 cm.
Yale Center for British Art (B1970.3.793)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

THE HEARTY GOOD FELLOW

No. 193
Publish'd 2 May 1794 by Laurie & Whittle 53 Fleet Street, London

A large, obese man sits at a table in the courtyard outside an alehouse, holding a rotund cannister topped by a head of foam almost as large as the cannister itself. He holds a clay pipe in his other hand. To the right, in the door marked with the diamond patterned sign of a pub, a small barboy with a handful of clay pipes, looks out at the viewer and gestures toward the hearty drinker. This is the reduced version of a larger droll sold by Robert Sayer, dated "Sept. 1st 1786." The earlier Sayer print includes the verse:

With my Pipe in one hand, & Jug in the other,
I drink to my Neighbour and my Friend//
My Cares in a Whiff of Tobacco I'll smother,
For Life you know shortly must end.

13.7 x 11.2 cm.
Lewis Walpole Library (794.5.12.23)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

ON THE WINGS OF LOVE

218
Publish'd 11th May 1794 by Laurie & Whittle 53 Fleet Street, London.

In an elegant salon, a young woman sits on a sofa beside a round end table that serves for writing. It holds an ink and pen stand and sheets of paper. A book stands propped against a table leg. She looks out and smiles as she points to a folded letter that she holds in her left hand.

14 x 11.3 cm.
Lewis Walpole Library (794.5.12.37)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

THE SCHOOL FOR LOVE, & c.

213
Published 11th May 1794 by Laurie & Whittle, 53 Fleet Street, London.

Two pretty young women, one in a large ribboned hat, the other with long blonde curls, listen as an organ grinder and the young girl, accompanying him on a cymbal, who play on the street beneath their window.

13.6 x 11.3 cm.
Lewis Walpole Library (794.5.12.5)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

SUCH THINGS ARE

216
Publish'd 11th May 1794 by Laurie & Whittle No. 53 Fleet Street London.

A well-dressed young woman in a large floppy hat with feathers, holds a curtain apart to reveal a window looking out on another building. She looks toward the viewer and points to her face. On her knee she balances a squirrel that peers out over the window sill. The elaborate dress, the reflexive gesture, and the squirrel all underscore the sexual import of her display. Behind her another woman leans over her shoulder, steadied by her hand on a small tea table to the right. She is more plainly dressed in a house cap and would be beyond the line of sight of a viewer outside.

The impression was also issued by Laurie and Whittle in the larger format in May 1794 with the title, The Frail Sisters.

13.6 x 11 cm.
Lewis Walpole Library (794.5.12.4.1)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

A HINT to MARRIED MEN

207
Published 12th May 1794 by Laurie and Whittle, 53 Fleet Street London.

A fashionable lady admires herself in her dressing table mirror as her French hairdresser points to the image. She is a handsome mature woman with an elegant hairdo, comprised of rows of curls, though she has not yet applied cosmetics nor is her hair powdered. The hairdresser leans over the dressing table from behind, two combs held by a waistband. The lady's bedchamber is elaborately decorated with patterned carpet and wallpaper, and a canopied bed with a floral design. Its leaded windows appear to look out upon a garden. The hint to married men is a warning about handsome young hairdressers who are so attentive to a wife's beauty. Though published in 1794, this reduced mezzotint is a reissue of a plate acquired when Laurie and Whittle bought out Robert Sayer the previous year. The earlier Sayer impression, dated "1st Augst 1787," includes four lines of verse that accentuate the warning to husbands:

Ye Husbands who wish to live peaceable lives
Ne'er admit a Frizure, to the rooms of your Wives//
When the Lady's in dishabille, & a bed's near
There is often two methods of dressing the hair.

An earlier issue of this image (below) is Lady Friz at her Toilet, published by William Humphrey, who was only active as a publisher of mezzotint drolls in the 1770's and early 1780's. This impression recalls the pointed A Hint to the Husbands, or the Dresser, Properly Dressed (BMC 5467) that Sayer published in 1777.

14 x 11.2 cm.
New York Public Library (MEZYRK), Lewis Walpole Library, Colonial Williamsburg Foundation

LADY FRIZ at her TOILET

Sold by W. Humphrey No. 227 Strand

The image described above, A Hint to Married Men, is here accompanied by four lines of verse:

Ma'dm Friz at her toilet is seen in full View
Surveying her head dress'd by Mons' frizeau,
Cosmetics are lying with powder & puff
In a hour or two she'll be handsome enough.

32.5 x 25.5 cm.
Lewis Walpole Library (colour, 780.0.36)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Yale Center for British Art, Yale University

Mr. THORNHILL'S first sight of OLIVIA

Published 12th May 1794, by Laurie & Whittle, No. 53 Fleet Street, London

In this scene from Oliver Goldsmith's The Vicar of Wakefield, Squire Thornhill has paused from his hunt to introduce himself to the Vicar and his family. The Vicar is seated at a writing table, an older son, Moses, holding a book stands behind him ( l.) His wife stands next to the son and reaches for a younger child. A small boy with book sits at the Vicar's feet. His two young daughters stand between the parents and Mr. Thornhill, who greets the oldest, Olivia, by seizing her hand in his and putting his other hand around her waist. She modestly looks away, and places one hand on his chest, warding off his presumptuous familiarity. In the background ( l.) a groom holds the squire's horse and his dog, a hound, stands in the foreground.

The YCBA impression, likely a proof, is untitled and uninscribed, but surviving impressions include the title, publisher, and date above, as well as the following passage from the novel:

At last, a young gentleman of a more genteel appearance than the rest came forward, and for a while regarding us, instead of persuing the chace, stopt short and giving his horse to a servant who attended, approach'd us with a careless, superior air. He seemed to want no introduction, but was going to salute my daughters as one certain of a kind reception; but they had early learnt the lesson//
of looking presumption out of countenance. Upon which he let us know that his name was Thornhill, & that he was owner of the estate that lay for some extent round us. He again therefore offered to salute the female part of the family; and such was the power of fortune and fine clothes, that he found no second repulse.
Vide. Vicar of Wakefield

A companion print is Mr. Thornhill Elopeing with Olivia. Both images are attributed to Robert Dighton.

31.7 x 24.9 cm.
Yale Center for British Art (untitled and uninscribed, B1970.3.755)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

THE PRODIGAL SON taking leave of his Father

Printed for R.D. BARRY, Chart & Printseller, St. Katherine's, London, 1797

As a small dog watches, the father clasps the hand of his son who is dressed for travel. Behind a servant walks out the door carrying the son's luggage. His mother sits at the table in the background, holding a napkin to her eye. A bust rests on the mantle over the door and a birdcage hangs from the ceiling. The text is from Luke 15:13: "He gathered all together and took his Journey into a far Country." This impression at the Lewis Walpole Library reproduces the first in a Prodigal Son series, published by Laurie & Whittle, May 12 1794 as a reissue of a set of four first printed for Robert Sayer, "1st Augt 1791."

Lewis Walpole Library (colour)

Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

THE PRODIGAL SON revelling with Harlots

Plate 2.
Published 12 May 1794 by Laurie & Whittle, 53 Fleet Street London

Three young gentlemen carouse with three young women. To the far right one amused woman reclines on a couch with a goblet in one hand and her left hand pointing to the only standing figure, the Prodigal Son. He is dressed in riding gear, his hat slightly askew toward the back of his head, and his whip on the floor at his feet. He holds one bottle high and pours wine from another toward one of two goblets sitting on a square table before him with a plate of nuts or candies. He is not looking at the table though and a stream of wine is spilling between the two goblets. Another woman sits to the front of the table with her knees crossed, clasping a napkin, and behind her a second gentlemen (r.) reaches for the raised bottle in the Prodigal Son's hand. Behind in the center, a seated gentleman and woman exchange glances, intent on each other. A small cat lies in the foreground. The only one of three paintings on the wall that is readable seems out of place in a brothel. It shows a country scene in which a man with a stick drives off a one-legged man on crutches and may be a satirical comment on the brutality that upholds such wealth and privilege. The inscription reads, "He wasted his Substance with Riotous Living.--St. Luke Ch. 15 V 13.

Reproduced in Dolmetsch (1979), p. 160.

31.5 x 25 cm.
Library Company of Philadelphia, New York Public Library (untitled and uninscribed), Lewis Walpole Library (inscribed to "R.D. Barry, Chart & Printseller, St. Katherine's, London, 1797," colour)

Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

THE PRODIGAL SON in Misery

Published 12th May 1794 by Laurie & Whittle, 53 Fleet Street London.

The Prodigal Son clasps his chest shivering as he sits in tattered cloths, shoeless, outside a farmyard, from which two young women laugh at him. Behind them near the farmhouse, a farmer walks with a wheelbarrow. In the foreground stand two pigs as a small dog barks at them. In the distance (r.) other pigs feed from a trough and lie about in a field. The inscription reads: "He would fain have filled his Belly with the Husks that the Swine did eat. St. Luke Ch. 15 V 16."

Reproduced in Dolmetsch (1979), p. 161.

31.5 x 25.1 cm.
Library Company of Philadelphia, Lewis Walpole Library (inscribed to "R.D. Barry, Chart & Printseller, St. Katherine's, London, 1797," colour)

 

THE PRODIGAL SON returned home Reclaimed

Printed for R.D. BARRY, Chart & Printseller, St. Katherine’s, London, 1797

The son kneels at his father's feet. The text reads. "Father, I have Sinned against Heaven, and in thy Sight, and am no more worthy to be called thy Son. St. Luke Ch. 15, V,21.

This is the fourth in the reissue by R.D. Barry of a Prodigal Son series earlier published by Laurie & Whittle, 1794, an edition that recycles Robert Sayer's plates from 1791.

32.3 x 25 cm.
Lewis Walpole Library (colour, 797.0.64-67)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Yale Center for British Art, Yale University

THE SQUIRE'S DAUGHTER

Published May 12th 1794 by Laurie & Whittle, No. 53 Fleet Street, London

The subtitle,"lamenting the loss of her Robin," tells the tale. A young woman sits by a window grieving for the dead bird on the table before her next to its cage. A large muff lies on the table beyond her settee, and her cloak is drapped over a stand nearby. The innuendo of the muff and allusion to the "Swain I adore" suggests that more has been lost than a bird.

No more my Sweet Bird can you Delia Delight
Or with Melody Cheer the New Morn.
No more need I stray to cull the fresh Weed
Nor with plantain your Prison Adorn.//
How cruel O'fate to Snatch my Sweet Bird,
Twas the gift of a Swain I adore.
How oft have I sat to hear its Sweet Note,
But alas! my poor Robin's no More.

Elements like the muff and bird as a lover's gift, links the image to awakening desire and disillusionment.

32.5 x 25 cm.
Yale Center for British Art (B1970.3.795)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University
Robert Sayer, 1788, private collection

EMMA CORBETT

375
Published 14th May 1794 by Laurie & Whittle, 53 Fleet Street

A woman sits in a ship's cabin involved in her handiwork. Before her on a table is a box and clothes. On the sill of the port behind her is a crumpled soldier''s coat from which a sword hilt protrudes. Out the other port can be seen a sailing ship. The inscription reads, "Making Childbed Linen during a Voyage at Sea."Laurie & Whittle had reissued the impression from a plate by Robert Sayer, first published "14 July 1788." The 1788 impression presents a more robust Emma with her large hat and flowing locks.

The reference here is to a British novel of the American Revolution, Emma Corbett or, The miseries of civil war. Founded on some recent circumstances which happened in America, by Samuel Jackson Pratt (1749-1814) published in 1780 under the pseudonym, Courtney Melmoth. Emma Corbett had sailed to America to find her lover Henry Hammond, a missing British soldier. Captured and imprisoned by the rebels, she is released through General Washington's intervention. She saves Henry who has been wounded by a poisoned Indian arrow by sucking out the venom. They marry and she is expecting a child when she begins a fatal decline from the effects of the venom. The grieving Henry dies. The print represents a poignant final scene of the novel. Returning to England by sea, the widow Emma, pregnant and failing herself, sews for the infant daughter who will survive her. Details are from the novel. The coat behind her is from " the man's apparel in which I fought for my poor Henry,"and "A little white robe or wrapper lay on the table finished before her."

The novel was republished in 1784 and again in 1786 under the title, Emma Corbett, exhibiting Emma and Henry, the faithful lovers; as delineated by themselves in their original letters. The several editions, as well as the several mezzotint impressions (at least two editions and one miniature), indicate the novel's popularity.

32.5 x 25.5 cm.
Lewis Walpole Library (colour, 794.5.12.18; also holds a miniature, 14.2 x 11.5 cm., numbered 219 with title and publisher's credit but without the explanatory inscription, 794.5.12.17)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

THIS is YOUR SORT--Here's to ye

418
London. Printed for Bowles & Carver No. 69 St. Pauls Church Yard. Published 4 June 1794

A leering man, his flat hat and crop indicating he is a coachman, grins and points to the foaming cannister he holds in his right hand. This miniature is engraved in the oval, one of several published by Bowles & Carver, though distinctive for being dated.

13.9 x 11.1 cm.
Lewis Walpole Library (794.6.4.1)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

JACK'S RETURN AFTER LORD HOWE'S GLORIOUS VICTORY

A British sailor looks out at the viewer holding out a purse in his left hand and in his other hand a bludgeon as well as a strip of paper, perhaps a list of French casualties. Behind him a woman who may the sailor's companion is handed a punch bowl from a pub window by a man smoking a clay pipe. Another man smoking a pipe and a woman also appear in the window. The pub wall is inscribed above,"The Royal Sovereign," then below, "Lord Howe," and at the bottom,"God Save the King." A smaller sign below reads, "Dragoons, Cornwallis." A large dog, like a mastiff, sleeps at the base of the pub wall. On the left can be seen an anchored ship and several men rowing a boat to shore. The print celebrates the defeat of the French and Spanish in the Battle of the First of June 1794 by the channel fleet under Admiral Richard Howe's command. Uncropped versions of this impression read "Publish'd 1st Augt. 1794 by Laurie &Whittle, No. 53 Fleet Street, London" and include the verse, set to the tune of "Oh! Dear what can the matter be":

O! Dear had I but words to tell,
O! Dear what I this moment feel,
O! Dear how all my senses reel,
O! how the French have been drubb'd!
Now France hold your jaw,
& leave off with your boasting
And no longer success to your Navy be toasting,
For, by heavens, I think you have had a good roasting,
Then let us continue to fight.
Oh! Dear &c.
Our fleet was engag'd and the French as expected,
And wish'd by all ranks, save a few disaffected,
Have not only been Tuck'd up, but also dissect'd!
Then let us continue to fight
O! Dear &c.//
Two Ships we have sunk, beside Six we 'ave taken,
The rest by our guns have been cursedly shaken,
And will probably not all escape with their bacon,
Then let us continue to fight.
O! Dear &c.
Their Admiral, like a brave skillful commander,
Not wishing his own or his men's blood to squander,
But hiss'd for a while, then turn'
d tail like a gander,
Then let us continue to fight.
O! Dear &c.//
Poor fellow! I grant that 'twas no mighty wonder,
That he made such a rascally cowardly blunder,
For it was the first time he had heard British thunder,
Then let us continue to fight.
O! Dear &c.
The Convention, I think, will not now talk of Slaughter,
And swear they will grant to the British no quarter
For, for one man, wee fifty can make a head shorter,
The let us continue to fight.
O! Dear &c.
Friends, believe, for indeed 'tis a well grounded notion,
That Britons for ever shall rule o'er the ocean,
Whilst beef and strong beer set our courage in motion,
Then let us continue to fight.
O! Dear &c.
Then he'res Howe and the sailors of Britain for ever,
For we never need fear those French scoundrels no never
Whilst defended by heroes so brave and so clever,
Then let us continue to fight.
O! Dear &c.

28.3 x 25.1 cm.
Lewis Walpole Library (title only, 794.0.2)


Courtesy of the Mariners' Museum, Newport News, VA

THREE POOR MARINERS

Published 1st Sepr 1794 by Rt. Laurie & Js. Whittle, No. 53 Fleet Street London

The setting is the yard outside an seaside inn or pub, the establishment marked with the sign of the anchor. Two sailors are seated at a bench or low table, the one holds a mug and clay pipe, the other a loaf of bread. A bundle and a can sit on the table. The third sailor stands with a mug of beer in his right hand and points toward the sea where their ship can be seen anchored. He seems to be speaking to a barmaid who is coming out the pub door carrying a platter. The text beneath reads:

We be three poor Mariners,
Newly come from the seas.
We spend our lives in jeopardy,
While others live at ease.
Shall we go dance the round,
While others live at ease.
And he that is a bully boy,
Come pledge me on this ground.//
We care not for those martial men,
That do our states disdain,
But we care for those merchant-men
That do our states maintain.
To them we dance this round.
And he that is a bully gay,
Come pledge me on this ground.

29.2 x 25.3 x 29.2 cm.
The Mariners' Museum (1975.0023.1)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Yale Center for British Art, Yale University

THE MARKET LASS

Published 7th Novr 1794 by Laurie & Whittle, No. 53, Fleet Street, London

Preparing to go to market, the girl stands in the yard before her father's cottage, holding a basket in one hand and two chickens by the legs in the other. Her mother (l.) leans in profile to add goods to her basket. Her small brother approaches with his hat full of eggs. The father watches from behind with his scythe over his shoulder. Chickens feed in the yard and two piglets play before a sow. In the background a young man, the lass's "Swain," waits behind the stile. The image may be by Robert Dighton. The verse reads:

Tho' my dad I must own is but poor,
His Cot can each comfort supply,
The vine tendril curls round his door,
And streamlets meander anight;
Health reigns and rewards daily toil.
I rise at the lark's early song,
And meeting my Swain at the Stile,
To market we trip it along.//
Sweet scented as blossoms in May,
Butter-prints my neat basket o'erspread,
Milk-white chickens, cream cheese I display,
And I'll vouch ev'ry egg is new laid.
To partake in my health-earning toil,
My Swain holds it ne'er can be wrong,
Bears the weight of my load with a smile,
As to market we trip it along.//
Arriv'd soon I purchasers view,
Sell my Stock very oft in a trice,
Reap the produce to industry due.
But ne'er charge above market-price,
Returning, the way we beguile
With a tale, or a joke, or a Song,
Snatch a warm parting kiss at a stile,
To our cot then I trip it along.

29.9 x 24.8 cm.
Yale Center for British Art (B1970.3.794)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, New York Public Library

BRITISH SOLDIERS DROWNING CARE

347
Published 20th Novr 1794 by Laurie & Whittle, No. 53, Fleet Street, London

The scene is the officer's mess tent in a military encampment. Seven officers carouse around a table which contains a punch bowl, a sword, and wine glass. The figure foreground left in the group stands and pours a glass of wine. Behind him (l.) a servant uncorks another bottle. The seated officer in front of him looks on with a merry expression as do the two standing officers at the back, one of whom hoists his hat aloft. The officer far right has an arm in a sling and looks dejected. The two other officers seated, one smoking a pipe, appear to be engrossed in conversation. At the upper right, a flag, more tents, two soldiers on horseback, and part of a cannon can be seen through the tent flap. The verse accompanying the image reads:

How stands the glass around,
For shame, you take no care, my boys,
How stands the glass around!
Let wine and mirth abound,
The trumphets sound,
The colours they are flying boys,
To fight, kill, or wound;
May we be found
Content with our hard fate, my boys,
On the cold ground.
Why, soldiers, why,
Should we be melancholy, boys!
Why, soldiers, why,
Whose business is to die!
What fighting! Fie!
Hang care, drink round, be merry, boy,
Tis he, you, or I, Cold, hot, wet, or dry,
We're always bound to follow, boys,
And scorn to fly. It is but in vain,
I mean not to upbraid you, boys,
It is but in vain,
For soldiers to complain;
The next campaign,
All in the field of battle, boys,
Perhaps we may be slain,
But should we remain,
A bottle and kind landlady
Cures all our pain.

The inscription (publisher and date) and verse is from an impression of British Soldiers Drowning Care in the British Museum.

28.9 x 25 cm.
Lewis Walpole Library (title only, 794.11.20.2.1), New York Public Library (untitled and uninscribed impression, MEZYRK)


Courtesy of the Print Collection, Lewis Walpole Library, Yale University

THE FARMER COME TO TOWN ON A FOOLISH ERRAND

Publish 20th Nov 1794 by Laurie & Whittle, 53 Fleet Street, London.

A young man, well-dressed for a farmer in waist coat, jacket and breeches, stands on a city street, holding a tote bag and speaking to two women, perhaps prostitutes, one of whom holds her hand out as if appealing to him. Her companion clasps her other arm and looks with her at the farmer. Another woman sits at his feet, hawking sheet ballads and fruit. A basket of apples stands beside her and she has posted several ballads on the wall next to her. In the distance along the street can be seen, a woman and her child, a man carrying a bundle and a carraige. Church spires, one of which may be the dome of St. Paul's, can be seen further on. In the poem he explains his errand to the two women:

When I was a home, as the Lark I was gay,
That warbles so wantonly Sweet in the Spring,
At the plough, or at thrashing, I'd labour all day,
Or when driving my team, how I'd whistle and sing!
Spruce Fan was my darling, a neat pretty maid,
But then from our village unkindly did rove;
So finding her gone, and my hopes all betray'd,
I be com'd up to town, my journey is Love.
Over head I was sens'd in affection, I vow,
Nor morn, noon, or night could a gay moment bring,
At thrashing, or driving the team or the plough,
No more the blyth lay could I whistle or sing;
For Fan was my darling, a neat pretty maid,
And she from our village unkindly did rove;
So finding her gone and my hopes all betray'd,
I be com'd up to town, and my journey is Love.
She was kind to me once, aye, as kind as she's fair;
In her ears love-lorn ditties I'd frequently ding,
Which she would admire, and I vow and declare,
She was pleas'd with the notes that I'd whistle & sing,
Efeggs! then, I thought her my own pretty maid;
But away from our village fair Fanny did rove,
So thinking her gone and my hopes all betrayed,
I be com'd up to town, and my journey is Love.

28 x 25 cm.
Lewis Walpole Library (colour, 794.11.20.1)


Next
Dated Index
Dated Satires
Home