David Campion
Pamplin Associate Professor of History
Miller Center 409 | MSC 41
Lewis & Clark College
0615 SW Palatine Hill Road
Portland, Oregon 97219, USA
Tel: 503.768.7435
Fax: 503.768.7418
campion@lclark.edu



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS


HIST 259: INDIA IN THE AGE OF EMPIRE

The political, cross-cultural, and social development of India from the classical civilizations of late antiquity to the beginning of British rule in the 18th century. Artistic and architectural achievements of Indo-Islamic civilization; the Mughal Empire and regional polities; religious and cultural syncretism; influence of contact with the West. Emphasis on the historical antecedents of contemporary debates about South Asia's regional and religious identities, state formation and fragmentation, and the origins of colonialism.

Prerequisite: None
Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Emperor Shah Jahan receiving eldest son Dara Shikoh, 1650 © Los Angeles County Museum of Art
HIST 217: THE EMERGENCE OF MODERN SOUTH ASIA

The social, economic, and political history of the Indian subcontinent from the 18th century to the present. The cultural foundations of Indian society; the East India Company and the expansion of British power; the experience of Indians under the British Raj; Gandhi and the rise of Indian nationalism; Independence and Partition; the postcolonial nations of South Asia. Thematic emphasis on the causes and consequences of Western imperialism, religious and cultural identities, and competing historical interpretations.

Prerequisite: None
Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Mohandas Gandhi, 1946 © Margaret Bourke-White, Time-Getty
HIST 221: TUDOR & STUART BRITAIN, 1485-1688

The British Isles from the 14th century to the Glorious Revolution. The church and state in late medieval Britain; the English and Scottish Reformations; Elizabeth and her realm; evolution of monarchical and aristocratic power under the Tudors and Stuarts; Shakespeare, Milton, and the English literary renaissance; conquest and settlement in Ireland; Cromwell, the Puritans, and the English Civil War; life in the villages and the growth of the mercantile economy; the Glorious Revolution and the shaping of constitutional monarchy.

Prerequisite: None; HIST 120 recommended
Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Coronation Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I, 1558 (artist unknown) © National Portrait Gallery, London
HIST 222: BRITAIN IN THE AGE OF REVOLUTION, 1688-1815

Britain and its people from the Glorious Revolution to the end of the Napoleonic War. The end of absolutism and the rise of the constitutional monarchy; the Augustan Age: arts, letters, and religion; the Atlantic world and British overseas expansion; the Enlightenment and Scientific Revolution; the American Revolution and its aftermath; Union with Scotland and Ireland and the creation of the British national identity; the revolution in France and the wars against Napoleon; the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution.

Prerequisite: None; HIST 121 recommended
Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Nicholas Pocock, HMS Victory at anchor, 1807 © National Maritime Museum, Greenwich
HIST 224: THE MAKING OF MODERN BRITAIN, 1815-PRESENT

Britain from the Industrial Revolution to the present. Industrialization and its social consequences; the shaping of Victorian society; the rise and fall of the British Empire; the Irish question and the emancipation of women; political reform and the rise of mass politics; the age of total war; popular culture, immigration, and multi-cultural society. Themes include the growth of the social and economic class structure, the shaping of national and regional identities, and the consequences of imperialism.

Prerequisite: None; HIST 121 recommended
Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Celebrating V-E Day, May 8th, 1945 © Getty Images
HIST 298: LITERATURE AND HISTORY OF MODERN IRELAND

An interdisciplinary approach to the study of Ireland from the mid-19th century to the present. Literary study focuses on the works of Yeats, Joyce, Shaw, Synge, Kavanagh, and O'Casey along with contemporary authors Heaney and Doyle. Historical topics include famine and emigration; home rule, republicanism, and unionism; the war for independence, the Irish Civil War, and the "Troubles" in Northern Ireland; religion, politics, and civil society in the Irish Republic. This course counts towards the English major.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; HIST 121 recommended
Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Jack B. Yeats, The Liffey Swim, 1923 © National Gallery of Ireland, Dublin
HIST 298: MODERN EAST AFRICA

The colonial and postcolonial development of East Africa from the mid-19th century to the present. European exploration, missionary activity, and interaction between indigenous societies and settler populations; formation of the colonial state and economy; technological and agrarian development and its consequences; African nationalism, independence, and regional integration; the postcolonial politics and economies of Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda. Required course for the East Africa Program; taught in Kenya and Tanzania.

Prerequisite: Participation in 2008 East Africa Program
Taught: Fall 2008 (possibly repeated), 4 semester credits

----Baroness Karen Blixen-Finecke, Portrait of a Kikuyu girl, 1924 © Karen Blixen Museum, Nairobi, Kenya
HIST 328: THE BRITISH EMPIRE

The history of British overseas expansion from the early 17th century to the end of the 20th century. Theories of imperialism; Britain's Atlantic trade network; the Victorian empire in war and peace; collaboration and resistance among colonized peoples; India under the British Raj; the Scramble for Africa; the effects of empire on British culture; the creation of the British Commonwealth; the rise of nationalism in the colonies; decolonization and postcolonial perspectives. This course counts toward the International Affairs major.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor; HIST 121, 222, or 224 recommended. Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Robert Home, Lord Cornwallis receives the sons of Tipu Sultan as hostages, 1792 © National Army Museum, London
HIST 400: COLLOQUIUM: EMPIRE AND INDEPENDENCE IN THE MODERN WORLD

This reading-intensive course focuses on the steady dismantling of Europe's overseas empires during the latter half of the 20th century, primarily in Asia and Africa. A critical and comparative analysis of such examples as India/Pakistan, Kenya, Algeria, Vietnam, and Jordan as well as a focus on postcolonial literature and theory. Readings are drawn from a wide range of historical scholarship addressing the political, cultural, social, and economic dimensions of decolonization and its legacies in our own time.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor; HIST 121, 224, or 328 recommended. Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Union Jack lowered after the death of King Fuad, Cairo Citadel, 1936 © Getty Images
HIST 400: COLLOQUIUM: POLITICS AND SOCIETY IN MODERN IRELAND

A comparative and critical analysis of the political and social development of Ireland from the late 18th century to the present. The birth of Irish republicanism; the Catholic Church and the Protestant Ascendancy; the Famine and the diaspora; the Irish literary renaissance; Home Rule campaigns and rise of Ulster Unionism; the Easter Rising and the war for independence; Northern Ireland's "Troubles"; contemporary politics and society. Competing interpretations of history and the shaping and reshaping of Irish identities.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor; HIST 121, 222, or 224 recommended. Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Easter 1916 Mural, Whiterock Road, Ballymurphy, West Belfast, 1991 © BBC Online
HIST 450: SEMINAR: THE VICTORIANS

This seminar focuses on the transformation of Britain and its empire from the coronation of Queen Victoria in 1837 to her death in 1901. Readings and discussions provide thematic emphasis on the development of class society, urbanization, science and technology, crime and punishment, political and social reform, religious and intellectual history, imperial expansion, and biographical study of key figures. The aim of the course is the completion of a major research paper.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor; HIST 300 required; HIST 121, 224, or 328 recommended. Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee silver double florin, struck 1887
HIST 450: SEMINAR: THE BRITISH RAJ: INDIA, 1857-1947

This seminar traces, chronologically and thematically, the various and often competing strands of British imperial control over the Indian subcontinent from the Revolt of 1857 until the independence of India and Pakistan in 1947. The scope of the readings and discussions include the ideological, political, technological, social, economic, psychological and cultural impact of the British in India and Indian society under colonialism. The aim of the course is the completion of a major research paper.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor; HIST 300 required; HIST 217, 224, or 328 recommended. Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Sir Humphrey Trevelyan, ICS, and Maharaja Bhawani Singh of Chhatarpur, 1942 © Private Collection of Lady Trevelyan
HIST 450: SEMINAR: 20th-CENTURY BRITAIN AND EMPIRE

The focus of this seminar is the transformation of Britain and its empire from the Edwardian era to the beginning of the 21st century. Readings and discussions provide thematic emphasis on the political, social, and cultural history of British society: the impact of the two world wars, the building of the welfare state, cultural and social changes during the interwar and postwar years, and decolonization and the rise of a multicultural society. The aim of the course is the completion of a major research paper.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of the instructor; HIST 300 required; HIST 121, 224, or 328 recommended. Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Royal Marines march toward Port Stanley, East Falkland, 1982 © Ministry of Defence
HIST 300: HISTORICAL MATERIALS

The materials and craft of historical research. Bibliographic method; documentary editing and annotating; use of specialized libraries, manuscripts, government records, oral interviews, photographs, maps and nautical charts, newspapers and periodicals, art and architecture, and physical artifacts; career options in history. Through in-class exercises and individual editing projects students gain skills in library research, editing, writing, analysis of sources, and historical judgment.

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing; preference given to history majors and minors
Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Rare books in the Dibner Library of the History of Science and Technology © Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC
CORE 107: THE WAR TO END ALL WARS: THE FIRST WORLD WAR AND ITS LEGACIES

This section of the first-year core program offers a broad and interdisciplinary focus on the First World War and its legacies in our own time. The origins of the war and the breakdown of the international system; the experience of total war on the front and at home; science, technology and psychology of warfare; moral and philosophical arguments; the impact of the war on literature, art and music; the postwar peace settlement and the aftermath. Emphasis on developing writing and research skills.

Prerequisite: None; this course fulfills the second half of the first-year core program
Taught: Alternate years, 4 semester credits

----Poppies at the Cloisters of the Australian War Memorial, Canberra

Created by campion@lclark.edu
Updated: September 2014